Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Internet Security for Seniors

What your parents must know when online

Nowadays, Internet use among seniors is on the rise. But unfortunately, predators frequently prey upon the elderly taking priority of their trusting nature and a lack of tech knowledge. Statistics tell no lies. According to the Aviva agency survey, 73% of over-45s internet users confessed that they had been targeted by email scam and 6% of these claimed they had been caught in a cheat's net.


Although there are many techniques that everyone can use to identify a possible intruder before it causes any real harm, some older adults may say “I am too old for that stuff.” So it becomes their children's task to make their parents a more difficult target. Moreover, a lot of security tools are easy to set up and use, so even a twelve o'clock flasher can manage them.

These are some important things you must teach your grandparents to ensure they are safe when online:


1. Never assume any stranger online is a good man
Some older adults behave as if they were born yesterday. They trust every stranger that seems to be tender-hearted. There is a golden rule your parents must know: "unless you have a real-world relationship with the person trying to establish communication with you via email, video chat, messengers, he is likely looking to profit at the expense of you.”

Sometimes a stranger offers a deal that is too good to be true. There is every likelihood that the offer is fictitious and was created to make you reveal private information, install software with malicious code, or wire money to a hacker.

2. A good and secure password is a half the battle
Your parents' computer has to be protected with a password that is both hard to guess and complex. Just teach your lovely relatives how to create these passwords. In a perfect world, it will be a combination of random numbers, letters, and characters. No personal information such as date of birth, maiden name, or pet's name should be included. (And have a secure plan for remembering/retreiving passwords.)

3. Use security software
If you have a computer or any other device with Internet access, make sure that security software is installed.
  • Use a firewall to prevent unauthorized access to or from a private network.
  • Use antivirus software to protect your system from viruses and malware. 
  • Use a VPN to encrypt all incoming and outgoing bandwidth and hide your IP for secure internet shopping. 
All these tools are easy to install and use, some of them enable automatically when your computer system turns on.


4. Put your parents up to common scams worth knowing

Here are only a few of the rampant internet scams your parents have to watch out for:

Phishing It is the most popular type of scam nowadays. Scammers create a fake website of a church, hospital or any other company to make people reveal their personal data. Although the fake websites look legitimate (scammers use a company`s color scheme, logo, design), you can notice that it is a fake. Keep your eye out for a domain name. It may originate from a domain like Am.azon.com.

Banking Scams Hoaxers often send out emails that look like an email from your bank. They claim that they need your account details to confirm something or investigate unusual activity. Needless to say what they can do with access to your private data.

Lottery scams If you think that nobody believes in fake lottery emails, think again. That scam is both actionable and easy to perform. You receive an email that congratulates you for being the only winner. You are overjoyed. All you have to do is to enter your data in order to get your money. Guess what happens next...

5. Let them know you are there to help

Some older adults don't know what's what and might not be sure whether a website or email message is legitimate. That is their children's task to show them that we are ready to help in them become Internet literate. Let your parents know that they can ask you questions if they have any suspicions.No question is a dumb question when it comes to safety!

Author's bio:
Sam Chester is a tech enthusiast, computer geek, and founder of www.cooltechzone.com. This site was created as a non-profit project; it neither sells anything nor advertises any IT product. Together with his brother, Sam is struggling for the internet that is open, globally connected, trustworthy, secure and available to everyone.


Thanks Sam!
 
 

Saturday, October 19, 2019

MobileHelp Introduces TRELAWEAR

MobileHelp introduces a new line of pendants for the fashion conscious user. I know with my Mom, she hung "that ugly pendant thingy" on the lamp next to her recliner (where it was basically useless to her) and definitely refused to wear it when she went anywhere. And my Mom was far from being a diva about her fashion.

But I've heard these complaints from patients and family members for years. The pendants are ugly. They don't want to wear them. They remind them that they are getting old and need help. So that being said, TRELAWEARTM is now available for purchase and use with MobileHelp systems.

Per MobileHelp, "TRELAWEAR is a beautiful high-end “smart” jewelry accessory that includes best-in-class emergency response technology when paired to a compatible MobileHelp base station or mobile device that takes you anywhere you want to go...safely."

$120 Off MobileHelp Touch with Annual Plan at MobileHelp.com, no coupon needed!
Safety is one thing you cannot put a price on. Falls are a leading cause of death among the elderly. And even if your loved one doesn't suffer a major injury, they may not be able to get up and lying on the floor or ground for hours can be just as serious. This is something you can control.

With the holidays approaching, perhaps a pretty jeweled pendant would be the perfect gift for Mom, especially when she's impossible to buy for these days! And be sure to use the savings links on our site. (Yes, they are affiliate links and I make a small commission to help keep this site going. Thanks!)

Monday, September 16, 2019

Helpful Tech That Can Be Accessible and Affordable for Seniors


By Andrea Needham

 
Our lives revolve around tech these days. For senior parents and relatives, however, accessing the latest tech isn’t always easy. Learning how to use technology can be a challenge for some older adults, but thankfully, some of the most useful new gadgets are actually very simple to operate. So if you know a senior who could benefit from having more technology in his or her life, here are some basics you should know about the latest senior-friendly tech.



Mobile Technology Can Be Helpful for Seniors

Seniors may not be attached to their tech like younger generations, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t dialed into the ways technology can make their lives easier. For example, many older adults have fully embraced mobile technology, which includes smartphones and wearable tech. However, even though seniors may be keen on mobile technology, they aren’t always sure what features to look for when upgrading or buying a cell phone. Thankfully, there are tons of options for seniors when it comes to the right phone and data plan. Whether you or a senior loved one is looking for something that’s as simple as a flip phone (like the LG Exalt LTE), as durable as a military-grade phone (like Kyocera’s DuraXV LTE) or even a smartphone with senior-friendly modes included (such as the Samsung Galaxy J3 V 3rd Gen), finding the right fit in terms of features and price shouldn’t take much effort. Cell phones are not the only mobile tech that can be fun and practical for seniors; older adults can benefit from using wearable gadgets as well. For instance, smart watches are simple wearable tools that seniors can use to track their health and fitness, or even set reminders for medications and other essential tasks that need to be taken care of throughout the day.

Smart Home Tech Can Help Seniors Age in Place


If you are a family caregiver who is concerned about the safety of an aging parent or relative in their own home, you should really consider all of the ways that smart home tech can make aging in place safer. For example, installing smart lighting throughout the homes of older adults is a simple update that can reduce falls and help seniors move around their home with more ease. Motion detector lights are a great solution, since they activate when they sense movement and remove the need for seniors to switch them on and off themselves. Voice-assistant speakers, such as Google Home, can also be a valuable tool for seniors aging in place at home. These speakers not only provide seniors with a simple and effective way to call for help during an emergency, but they can also provide some much-needed relief from loneliness and isolation. Isolation-related depression is a common concern for aging adults living alone. Having the right tech can alleviate those feelings and provide some additional peace of mind for family caregivers, especially when they live far away.
-->Although not technically new, medical alert systems are another tech feature that can make aging in place safer for seniors, and can relieve stress for family members and caregivers.
Tech doesn’t have to be simple to be senior-friendly; it just needs to be easy for seniors to operate and use in their everyday lives. Thankfully, a great deal of the most advanced and newest tech is user-friendly and even affordable, so seniors can take advantage of all of the added convenience, comfort and quality of life that modern technology can provide.
Andrea Needham created Elders Day to remind everyone that getting older isn’t synonymous with slowing down. Everyone has their own pace, but age shouldn’t be what stops you from fulfilling dreams, goals, and desires.

Photo Credit: Pexels
#guestpost


Monday, September 9, 2019

The Ultimate Internet Safety Guide for Seniors




Follow the SafetyDetective blog daily as our tech experts keep you up-to-date on antivirus software.

Every year, seniors are scammed out of tens of billions of dollars, money they’ve spent their entire lives saving only to have it stolen. The elderly have always been a prime target for Internet scams because of a perceived vulnerability, and now because Internet use among seniors is on the rise. A Pew Research Center survey showed that 67% of seniors are now regular Internet users.

Internet security is something everyone should prioritize, regardless of age, so it’s important to be aware of current threats and how to deal with them. With so many people online, the magnitude of scams is increasing.

 

Protect Your Computer

Hackers are always on the lookout for vulnerable systems that they can break into. Viruses and other malware often infect a computer through email attachments, compromised software, or vulnerable Bluetooth connections. With so many powerful, affordable security tools on the market, there’s no reason to risk an infection.

Install a Firewall
A firewall acts as the first layer of protection between your computer and any third-party by acting as a barrier. If you’re using a home computer, you need to ensure that your firewall is always turned on. Depending on your operating system, you can turn on Windows Firewall through the Control Panel. It will also notify you if any attempts have been made to compromise your security. If you’re a Mac user, we recommend you check out our list of vetted antivirus programs.

Install an Antivirus Program
Antivirus software is one of the most important solutions you can use to avoid infections. Both free and paid versions exist, and the most popular free options include Avast Free Antivirus, Microsoft Windows Defender, and AVG Antivirus. Make sure that any software you use is regularly updated and running the latest version.

As for ease of use, we highly recommend the following:
  • Norton by Symantec is a great all-around option that is reliable and easy to use.
  • Comodo offers a seamless experience. Start and stop scans with only one click.
  • If you’re looking for more options, check out our reviews on some of the best antiviruses on the market.
Installing Ad Blockers
Advertising is important for helping websites stay in business and keeping the cost of internet use down for consumers. However, some sites take things too far with so many ads you can’t even see the screen. Other websites may even be using ads to hide malware, a trick known as malvertising.
Some of this malware can install on your computer by simply visiting the webpage, even if you don’t click on the ad. Luckily, an ad blocker is easy to install or can be added as a simple extension to your browser.

The best free ad blockers include Adguard for Chrome and Firefox, AdRemover for Chrome, and Ghostery for Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Internet Explorer, Android, and iPhone iOS.
You also want to protect your system against other possible threats like spyware. Window’s users can download the Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool from the Windows Download Center. Both Windows and Mac users can use an anti-spyware solution like Malwarebytes.

 
Use Complex Passwords

Your computer needs to be protected with a password that is both complex and hard to guess. Ideally, it will be a combination of letters, numbers, and special characters. It also shouldn’t include any information that people can easily guess about you like your birthday or name.

Using these steps will ensure that any activity that you do on the internet does not negatively impact your computer. The software will protect your computer against any breaches and will notify you of the same. However, even with this software, you have to use your diligence in who you interact with and which websites you visit. The software can’t protect you against any scams and can only protect your computer system.

Avoiding Common Scams

Cybercrime is the fastest growing crime internationally, and it is estimated that it cost $600 billion last year alone. With so many threats, it can be difficult to protect yourself. Here are only a few of the rampant internet scams to watch out for:

Email Scams Scams that are communicated through an email are the most common. Phishing, for example, tries to steal sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details for malicious purposes.

Phishing typically involves a scammer pretending to be someone else. The email looks real and will have a company’s color scheme, logo, and design style. It may feature an offer that seems too good to be true. However, if you look closely at the domain, you’ll notice it isn’t real. It may originate from a domain like Amazon.com, for example. When you click a link in that email, you will be taken to a website that may infect your computer with malicious threats. If you complete a purchase on this fake website, your credit card will likely be stolen.

Another form of email scams is whaling. It’s a lot like phishing, but the scammer targets businesses or C-level executives. Likewise, the email seems to come from a high-ranking executive, providing the scammer access to an account. The Snapchat CEO’s name, for example, was used in a mass email sent to his employees; it was successful in obtaining sensitive information about the company’s employees. To avoid this scam, verify the identity of the person sending you the email. If the email address and credentials check out but you’re still suspicious, contact the person or company about the email before following through.

To continue reading go the original article.

Used with permission.

BY: Eric C
Eric is a professional cyber tech expert with almost a decade of experience writing about security and tech. In recent years, he has been focused heavily on the rapidly developing fintech and cryptocurrency industries and how they relate to online security.
TAGS: PERSONAL SECURITY
POSTED: DECEMBER 16, 2018